Paynuse

This paynuse recipe took me by surprise so much so that I have to put aside all my other plans and make this one to post. A few months ago a few people asked me to post this recipe, but as always on the site one recipe gets side tracked for another (like this one now) and it got lost in time for a while.

Paynuse: A Recipe to Post

But, recently I was playing a little guessing game on my facebook fanpage and group and there it showed itself again as if it was saying, “Post me please”. The game involved guessing the recipe based on a highly zoomed in picture.

All was fine until one of my admins, Mrs. Vidya Champatsingh-Ali, gave me a picture to guess. So to speak, the tables were turned on me and I had a ball trying to figure out what she was making. To my surprise, there it was…. Paynuse in all its glory. This time I wasn’t going to allow time and distractions to get in the way. I had to post this recipe as soon as possible. So I asked her for the recipe and after some extensive research, a few experiments, and bloopers, the right measurements and technique was learnt. I also have to say a big thanks to my aunt who showed me the finer points of making Paynuse which you would see in a moment.

What is Paynuse

OK, So you still do not know what is paynuse? Well, this is one of the more rare delicacies that the East Indians make on the island. Slowly it is becoming commercially available. I saw it at Extra Foods in Grand Bazaar being sold in cups. Usually it is made with the milk of a cow that has just given birth (Colostrum) but nowadays we have all types of milk on the market (no need to wait for the cow to give birth anymore!) So, without further ado here’s Paynuse.

Paynuse Recipe

Paynuse
PAYNUSE

2 cups powdered milk
3 cups water
3/4 cup sugar
1 stick cinnamon
3 tbsp grated ginger
4 tbsp lime juice
1 dash almond essence
2 dash of bitters

 Mix powdered milk and water. Bring to boil.
 Add lime juice, cinnamon and ginger.
When it makes the “Saree” (curds) remove it and throw away the whey.
Wash pot. Add curds, bitters almond essence and sugar.
Cook over low heat stirring occasionally until golden and crumbly.
Note: The fire has to be very low.

So I hope you enjoy this recipe. I really enjoyed doing it. Coming up next …..maybe something with meat….
More recipes to come.

Ah gone!

P.S.  Don’t forget to leave a comment about this Paynuse recipe in the comment box below.

, , , , , , , , , , , ,

12 Responses to Paynuse

  1. Cynthia June 29, 2012 at 2:50 pm #

    Love paynuse, it is one of the favourite recipes in my book. So I notice that you throw away the whey…. I leave mine in and let it cook down, of course that means that the paynuse takes longer. Try it the next time without throwing away the whey. :)

  2. Felix June 29, 2012 at 8:51 pm #

    Next time I will :-) Is there a difference if you just let it cook down?

  3. 259d635c-e762-11e1-a931-000f20980440 August 16, 2012 at 5:20 am #

    Does it make a difference is I use brown sugar or caster sugar ?

  4. nyricardo August 16, 2012 at 5:21 am #

    Does it make a difference is I use brown sugar or caster sugar ?

  5. Felix August 18, 2012 at 5:48 pm #

    You may have to use less caster sugar since it is sweeter. Use your discretion.

  6. Sadia November 20, 2012 at 7:02 pm #

    I love paynuse. Can I use regular full cream milk? And how much do I use if I can? Thanks! And keep up the work!

    • Felix November 20, 2012 at 9:10 pm #

      Do you mean the liquid full cream?

  7. Mattie November 28, 2012 at 4:13 pm #

    Is there a possibility that you can post how to make the Cheese Paynuse?

  8. melissa January 27, 2013 at 7:51 pm #

    I luv paynuse but never knew how to make it until now. thanks so much

  9. Spazv March 6, 2014 at 7:42 pm #

    Hi- Can this be made using soy, almond, rice milk etc?

  10. Ingrid Vialva August 21, 2014 at 12:06 am #

    Very easy and delicious

Leave a Reply


six × 1 =

You might also likeclose
MyFreeCopyright.com Registered & ProtectedProtected by Copyscape Duplicate Content Detection Tool